Newsletter Archive

April is Lawn Care Month

April is National Lawn Care Month

In recognition of spring, the Professional Lawn Care Association of America (PLCAA) has designated April as National Lawn Care Month.

As spring arrives, 30 million acres of turf across the nation are turning green and growing. PLANET (Professional Landcare Network) observes the importance of lawns and their aesthetic and environmental benefits during National Lawn Care Month each April. Please share these facts …

•  Well cared-for lawns can significantly increase property values.

•  A healthy lawn is of utmost importance to our environment.  A 50–foot by 50–foot lawn produces enough oxygen for a family of four.

•  Lawns cool the atmosphere.  Eight healthy front lawns have the cooling effect of 70 tons of air conditioning, which is enough for 16 average homes.

•  Grass converts carbon dioxide to oxygen, a process that helps clear the air.

•  Dense, healthy grass slows water runoff, removing contaminants and trapping soil. Fresh filtered water returns to the underground water supply.

Be proactive in April and use a lawn care program that will ensure both a healthy and beautiful lawn throughout the year.

http://www.landcarenetwork.org/cms/home.html

The Benefits of a Well–Maintained Lawn and Landscape.

A well–maintained lawn and landscape can be environmentally friendly and provide substantial ecological and community benefits in the following ways. 

  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a valuable green space in the urban environment.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a cleanser of dust and other  pollutants.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a contributor toward solving so–called climate change.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a cushion that minimizes injuries if someone falls.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a filter for pollutants originating rain water.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a habitat for thousands of species of birds and other wildlife.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a heat–dissipater for cooling the atmosphere, just like an air conditioner.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as an offsetter of carbon emissions.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a preventer of soil and water run–off.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a recharger of moisture in the atmosphere.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a recreational site for children and adults alike.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a reducer of noise and sun glare.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a regulator of carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can act as a stabilizer for preventing soil erosion and flooding.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can be used to reclaim and restore environmentally–damaged sites, such as landfills.
  • A well–maintained lawn and landscape can significantly contribute to increase property values.

Comment on McGuinty's Pesticide Ban

On November 20, 2007, the following headline appeared on the Premier's website.

"MCGUINTY GOVERNMENT REDUCING ENVIRONMENTAL TOXIN"

Part of the election promise was "Legislation to ban the cosmetic use of pesticides to be introduced in the spring of 2008."

Between now and February 17, 2008 the Environmental Registry is accepting public comment on just how this legislation should be crafted.

The website lists the purpose of the proposal and contains a link where comments can be submitted.

If you have any questions you would like Turf King to answer, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit our website to send us a comment.

www.hamilton.turfking.ca

The purpose of this proposal is to inform the public of the government's policy intent to implement a ban on the cosmetic use of pesticides, and solicit feedback from the public as the government considers policy options relating to the following:

1. Determining the Scope of the Ban

The proposed ban would apply to cosmetic uses of pesticides, those intended to improve the appearance of lawns, gardens, parks and school yards. Do you have any comments on the proposed scope?

The proposed ban would allow pesticides to be used in situations where it is warranted to help ensure public health (for example, to fight West Nile virus). Are there other situations where the use of pesticides should be allowed?

2. Sale of Cosmetic Pesticides

Other jurisdictions have banned the sale of pesticides used solely for cosmetic purposes while municipalities in Ontario have regulated the use of certain pesticides . Should the province consider banning the sale of those pesticides used solely for cosmetic purposes?

3. Exemptions/Restrictions

It is proposed that uses of pesticides for the purposes of agriculture and managed forests would be exempt, as they are already governed by stringent rules on the storage and application of pesticides.

The government indicated that the focus of the ban would be on “towns and cities, and not on restrictions on rural residents.” Do you have any comments on this approach?

4. Exemptions for Golf Courses

It is proposed that golf courses would also be exempt, but would be required to develop plans to limit the environmental impact of pesticides. Should the government consider setting out minimum requirements for the plans developed by golf course owners/operators? What should the requirements include?

5. Timing

The government proposes to introduce legislation in the spring of 2008, with a phased-in implementation (e.g. 3 years).